RideEatCamp

PCH – Day 5

Pacific Coast

Yesterday was highlighted by scenic coastline. Whenever we took the surface roads off Highway 101, we’d be rewarded with stunning ocean views. Today was more of the same, but instead of ocean views, we had the pleasure of riding through redwood forests.

Babe the Blue Ox oversees the entrance to the "Trees of Mystery" roadside attraction.
Babe the Blue Ox oversees the entrance to the “Trees of Mystery” roadside attraction.
Sunlight filters through a grove of trees on a surface road that took us off Highway 101. He highway provides Babe, the small road provides beauty.
Sunlight filters through a grove of trees on a surface road that took us off Highway 101. He highway provides Babe, the small road provides beauty.
The Crescent City lighthouse sits atop a rock that is only accessible during low tide.
The Crescent City lighthouse sits atop a rock that is only accessible during low tide.

Early in the ride between Brookings and Crescent City, we crossed into California, which meant we went from riding by farms instead of forests. The nice thing about the abundance of farms is the abundance of farm roads. We spent a majority of the ride on quiet two lane roads, a huge improvement from Highway 101, with its narrow shoulders and high speed traffic.

Our original plan was to ride about 100 miles and to stay around Trinidad or McKinleyville, but Peter’s knee has been getting progressively grumpier, so we called the ride early when we passed by an RV park sign that advertised tent sites and pie. It didn’t take much thought to decide to call Elk Country RV Park home for the night.

This park turned out to be a real treat. Because it was Labor Day weekend, the park hosts decided to include some group fun. First, they arranged a pot luck barbecue. Then once the sun set, they invited a group called Circus of the Elements, who performed some fire spinning routines. The girls who danced with the hula hoops on fire were the most impressive. Peter also befriended a couple in an RV next to us who gave us some of the best homemade granola bars I’ve ever eaten.

A performer uses a burning hula hoop to wow the crowd of campers at the Elk Country RV Park.
A performer uses a burning hula hoop to wow the crowd of campers at the Elk Country RV Park.

Most of the time RV Parks tend to be unappealing for cyclists because the sites are really designed for RVs: they’re deep and narrow with little to no natural screening between sites. Privacy tends to be limited and access to electricity usually means that people stay up later and thus the campsite is noisier. This was the case with this park too, but the unexpected holiday events and generally good vibe made all the difference.